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20121101
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at a target states, colorado, florida, iowa, nevada, ninja, north carolina, ohio, virginia, obama's percentage only declined 1.5% from 2008. in the rest of the country whether you're talking about solving republican or solidly democratic states are the kind of late target states, minnesota, pennsylvania, wisconsin, obama's percentage was down 2.8%, about double the amount. that he still would carry the rest of the country, aside from the target states, but not as big a percentage. one of the fascinating things about this election is an electorate that believes things are moving in the wrong direction and is getting congress dismal job ratings reelected democratic president, retained, adding even more republican -- democratic senate with some powerful assists from some republican candidates. [laughter] wonder if they've investigate the possibility of moles. anyway, they retained a republican house. got an article in "wall street journal" coming out tomorrow on this issue, the house issue. republicans come according to current can come have a net loss of only six seats in the house. they started
. .. but florida, virginia, you know, then it needed to go into iowa, it needed to go into nevada. then ohio would have put him over the top, and just didn't get anywhere near down that progression. and so, i mean, they're sort of a lot of things going on, but the most important thing is the republicans, i'm going to leave plenty of room, is that got to do something about their brand. it is just, basically the center, the center of the republican party is older white men. and that's not where this country is going. and when you look at african-americans, look at latinos, look at the fastest-growing group, asians, where that went 70 -- i think obama got 71, 72% of the asian vote. you know, the future doesn't look like the republican party. and if i worked the republican party, and i think, they're going to have to do some real soul-searching about immigration, about social cultural issues. because this is not a party that is designed for the future. if this were a business you would say they have an inherently flawed business model for the future. and republican parties have, you know, they have fo
side in particular but even i would include the, um, dean heller of nevada who won on the republican side really ran separate from -- not against, but separate from the party platform and the president. you know, if you look at claire mccaskill, john tester, heidi heitkamp from north dakota, joe donnelly for sure in the -- in indiana, these are people who won because they weren't, because they were saying i'm an independent voice, i'm not going to be beholden to my party. and i think that you have an opportunity -- whether or not they take it or not is quite another question -- but you have an opportunity to have a new center in the senate. it will be mostly made up of democrats, unfortunately, but i think it could be interesting to watch all of those people and how they behave particularly when it comes to tax reform. i think that's one praise where they could be tremendously influential and be the bridge that sort of gets that done. >> terrific. i think we still have microphone assistance, and let's play stump the band or ask whatever you like about next year's power structure. i s
on doors >> i think that is a good thing. the people in ohio, virginia, florida, nevada -- they took this election enormously seriously, understood the unique role they had to play. voters in battleground states understand they have a unique role a lot of us the citizens united to enjoy because they are not and state that will determine the president. >> the super pac's dynamic this time was obviously new and unprecedented. you had senate candidates -- sherrod brown in ohio had $40 million spent against him by super pac's. we had in the last week of our campaign $100 million spent against the president. that is more than the mccain campaign spent in its entirety. remarkable thing. a lot of senate candidates still one. but in house races it had an impact. barack obama, sherrod brown, governors -- they have definition. the spending is a little less nefarious. it's still tough to deal with, but you are not somebody who is now and then somebody drops $4 million on your head will have an impact. we have never seen spending like this. there is a term in politics called gross rating points,
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4